Holiday in Hamburg, part 2

Hello everyone! Part two of our holiday in Hamburg. Him Indoors is a big fan of model railways. We bought the tickets online so we didn’t have to queue for hours to see them. Miniatur Wunderland is a model railway attraction and the largest of its kind in the world. The railway is located in the historic Speicherstadt district of the city.

St. Peter’s Cathedral stands on the site of many former cathedrals. Built by order of Pope Leo X, it has been a Protestant cathedral since the Reformation and its congregation forms part of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Northern Germany. The best known artworks in St Peter’s are the lion-head door handles, located in the left wing of the west portal. However, the cathedral contains many additional works of art.

The Elbphilharmonie is a concert hall in the HafenCity quarter of Hamburg, Germany, on the Grasbrook peninsula of the Elbe River. It is one of the largest and most acoustically advanced concert halls in the world. It is popularly nicknamed Elphi.

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We walked along the harbour.

We had lunch at the Portuguese quarter.

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So, what made you smile this week?

For: The Weekly Smile 86 #weeklysmile

10 Days of Heat: STORY 2: Camp Life (Day 7)

Day-7-2017

camping-shit

Camping life is never for us
Tried it once and it didn’t work
Uncomfortable and what’s the fuss?
Camping life is never for us
End up fighting, sorry for cuss
So disastrous, came home berserk
Camping life is never for us
Tried it once and it didn’t work*

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

* A Triolet is a poetic form consisting of only 8 lines. Within a Triolet, the 1st, 4th, and 7th lines repeat, and the 2nd and 8th lines do as well. The rhyme scheme is simple: ABaAabAB, capital letters representing the repeated lines.

Make writing a Triolet more challenging! Make each line 8 syllables in length (4 metrical feet), written in iambic tetrameter (the more common way), or try it in pentameter (English version) where each line only has 10 syllables (5 metrical feet).

For: 10 Days of Heat: STORY 2: Camp Life (Day 7)

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 47 – #Haiku #Tanka #Haibun: Shadow & Light

dark-dawn

sun peeks through violet sky
we look at it and wonder why
it looks so peaceful we can fly
against the velvety sky stood in shadow the skyline
indigo clouds cover up the first stars that might shine
the chill of the light and a promise of a night divine
trees on the sides that go bold
faded highway that lay cold
all was dark as we strolled
we’re on our way home
world so monochrome
and we say shalom
till we meet again
it was nice to ken
time to say amen*

* The Christ-in-a-Rhyme, a shape poem of the spiriatual nature, was created by Christina R Jussaume on October 3, 2006, consists of five 3-lined stanza that must rhyme (scheme for this form is aaa, bbb, ccc, ddd, eee) and a syllable count of each stanza is as follows:

Stanza 1 – 8 syllables
Stanza 2 – 14 syllables
Stanza 3 – 7 syllables
Stanza 4 and 5 – 5 syllables.

The poem should be centered to show the cross that will be created. This form was created in memory her mother, Christina. The form and the example poem are copyrighted in Christina R Jussaume’s book, “My Walk with Jesus,” published by Publishamerica.#

For: Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 47 – #Haiku #Tanka #Haibun: Shadow & Light

052217_1924_colleenswee1

Trance – Daily Prompt

passage

the
passage
birth of pride
walk in a trance
where people seek, meet, greet and sometimes flirt
lights coming from the ceiling and the door
come in or out
you’re welcome
have fun
bye*

* Tetractys, a poetic form invented by Ray Stebbing, consists of at least 5 lines of 1, 2, 3, 4, 10 syllables (total of 20). Tetractys can be written with more than one verse, but must follow suit with an inverted syllable count. Tetractys can also bereversed and written 10, 4, 3, 2, 1.

Double Tetractys: 1, 2, 3, 4, 10, 10, 4, 3, 2, 1

goiter

yes, we were once some immigrants
my mother, father and my aunts
new to this country when we fled
left people as they cried and bled, like in a trance

we had no choice but to come here
leaving our country out of fear
and we tried to make this our home
as we bid farewell and shalom, our home so dear*

* The Florette, created by Jan Turner, consists of two or more 4-line stanzas.

Rhyme scheme: a,a,b,a
Meter: 8,8,8,12
Fourth line requirement of internal (b) rhyme scheme, on syllable 8.

Like the outgrowing of a small flower, the forth line of each stanza is longer, and enwraps the previous lines. Line #4 requires an internal rhyme scheme that rhymes the eighth syllable with the end of line #3, and continues to add on four more syllables than the other lines so that the fourth line ends rhyming with lines #1 and #2.

For: Trance

Other “trance” posts:
BT
https://hotwhitesnow.wordpress.com/2016/04/12/bedtime/
How to Change Careers and Find Happiness
https://wellsbaum.blog/2017/08/13/how-to-unthink/

Free from trammels of conforming

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Image credit: Bikurgurl, 2017

Free from trammels of conforming
These local boys play their music
Imbibing in their own culture
Not as malleable as others

I grin as I look through keyhole
Free from trammels of conforming
Taking all opportunities
As they touch people’s sentiments

With hindsight they could have gone there
Seeing the fata organa
Free from trammels of conforming
Still being naïve from their youth

So they play to their heart’s content
Loving every minute of it
When people smile and clap their hands
Free from trammels of conforming*

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

* A Quatern is a sixteen line French form composed of four quatrains. It is similar to the Kyrielle and the Retourne. It has a refrain that is in a different place in each quatrain. The first line of stanza one is the second line of stanza two, third line of stanza three, and fourth line of stanza four. A quatern has eight syllables per line. It does not have to be iambic or follow a set rhyme scheme.

line 1
line 2
line 3
line 4

line 5
line 6 (line 1)
line 7
line 8

line 9
line 10
line 11 (line 1)
line 12

line 13
line 14
line 15
line 16 (line 1)

week-169

For: 100 Word Wednesday: Week 32, Wordle #169