Imaginary – Daily Prompt

Jake’s her name, my imaginary friend
She’s always there, come what may
Even when I left the country
She’s my faithful companion
My strict critique, my conscience
My cheerleader, my ally, my confidante
I guess she grew up with me
And her life is not different from mine
Surrounded by her loved ones
Got a successful career
The ones we said we’d do have been done
We’ve weathered and survived them all
Challenges, hindrances, difficulties
Still going with the flow and wave of life
Enjoying life, its beauty and abundance
Isn’t life wonderful?

For: Imaginary

Other “imaginary” posts:
https://inkdropblog.wordpress.com/2017/06/03/a-colourful-place/
https://angloswiss-chronicles.com/2017/06/03/daily-prompt-imaginary-things/
https://epiphanyofsumi.wordpress.com/2017/06/03/so-be-it/
https://everydaystrangeblog.wordpress.com/2017/06/03/muse-of-the-day-63/

#SoCS June 3/17 – “whether/weather”

Whether the weather is lovely
Sunny or not we’re out cycling
To say thanks for what life can bring
We are so happy to be free
We sing a song we all belong
Climb a mountain or swim in sea
Thanks for the food we love cooking
Whether the weather is lovely

So glad we have this family
We may be afar but still cling
Support each one no need asking
When we’re together life is glee
Don’t get us wrong, we are strong
Challenges, we face life bravely
Count our blessing, life is a zing
So glad we have this family*

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

st-margaret-of-antioch-knotting-4

*
The Octain, full name Octain Refrain, is a form of poetry developed by English poet Luke Prater in December 2010.

It comprises eight lines as two tercets and a couplet, either as octosyllables (counting eight syllables per line), or as iambic tetrameter, whichever is preferable. Trochaic tetrameter also acceptable. The latter yields a more propulsive rhythm, as opposed to iambs, which lilt.

As the name suggests, the first line is a refrain, repeated as the last (some variation of refrain acceptable). Rhyme-scheme as follows –

A-b-b
a-c/c-a
b-A

A = refrain line. c/c refers to line five having midline (internal) rhyme (e.g. here/sneer), which is different to the a- and b-rhymes. The midline rhyme does not have to fall exactly in the middle of the line, in fact it can be more effective and subtle, depending on context, to have it fall earlier or later.

The High Octain is simply a double Octain, but as one poem – the refrains are the same, a- and b- rhymes are the same, but actual words are different, and the c/c line with the internal rhyme can optionally be rhymed in the second instance. There is no restriction on the level of repetition, but in most cases the stipulated refrain A is enough; this may even feel too repetitive and need varying. As a general guideline, changing up to four syllables of the eight still retains enough to feel like the refrain. The end word must remain the same.

The structure of the High Octain is one single after another with a break in between; alternatively, it can be written as two blocks of eight lines:

A-b-b-a-c/c-a-b-A
A-b-b-a-c/c-a-b-A [or d/d instead of c/c]

It is also possible to write a piece consisting of a string of single Octains (the rhymes of which would not usually correspond).

For: The Friday Reminder and Prompt for #SoCS June 3/17, Weekend Writing Prompt #5 – Gratitude

socsbadge2016-17

The farm – Saturday’s Mix– 3 June 2017

dsc_0044copy
credit: Eden Hills

Waking up in a cosy house
Aroma of baking in the kitchen
Seeded loaf in the oven and coffee brewing
Outside are some chicken and grouse

Grouse for dinner so delicious
Fresh eggs and milk from the cows for breakfast
The delight we feel as we wander through the farm
Swimming in the lake is gorgeous

Gorgeous is living in the farm
Hay bale, barn, some crops and vegetables, too
Smell of manure hangs thickly over the air
We don’t mind that, there is no harm

Harm no animals, joy they bring
Always with muddy boots as we work here
Might be hard work but we’re getting enough workout
The sun is up so we’re waking*

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

* The RemyLa Rhyme Form, a form created by Laura Lamarca, consists of 4 stanzas. Each stanza has four lines. The syllable count per stanza is 8/10/12/8 and rhyme scheme is abca defd ghig jklj. The first word of stanza 1 must also be the last word of stanza 4. The last word of stanza 1 must also be the first word of stanza 2 and the last word of stanza 2 must be the first word of stanza 3. Finally, the last word of stanza 3 must also be the first word of stanza 4.

This form is named after Laura’s daughter, Remy Lawren Lamarca. La is her signature.

For: Saturday’s Mix–3 June 2017