Greek girls picking up pebbles on the beach

Greek girls picking up pebbles on the beach

1024px-frederic-lord-leighton-greek-girls-picking-up-pebbles-by-the-sea-1871
by Frederick Leighton

Greek girls picking up pebbles on the beach
Their fingernails becoming brown from them
Sea breeze and under the sun their clothes bleached

Soldiers come back, saying a prayer each
Not to get wet holding on to their hems
Greek girls picking up pebbles on the beach

Their bodies covered with pink, white and peach
Waiting at the doors, they were such a gem
Sea breeze and under the sun their clothes bleached

They later found some papers at their reach
They want their soldiers back alive, these femmes
Greek girls picking up pebbles on the beach

They followed everything from what was preached
And of course, they don’t want to be condemned
Sea breeze and under the sun their clothes bleached

They want them back, alive, a soldier each
They lovingly dedicate this poem
Greek girls picking up pebbles on the beach
Sea breeze and under the sun their clothes bleached*

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

* A Villanelle is a nineteen-line poem consisting of a very specific rhyming scheme: aba aba aba aba aba abaa.

The first and the third lines in the first stanza are repeated in alternating order throughout the poem, and appear together in the last couplet (last two lines).

One of the most famous Villanelle is “Do not go Gentle into that Good Night” by Dylan Thomas.

For: Microfiction challenge: Looking for pebbles, Wordle 285 Feb 5 by Brenda Warren

banner

We are going, the horse gallops

996px-john_bauer-hacc88sten_ledde_han_vid_betslet
John Bauer

We are going to the circus
On a white horse with big Boris
In a magic place we will be
We’ll have great fun we all agree
And at the end for an encore we are baying
No fuss from us all and for sure, we are going

The horse gallops and we all shout
We sing on our way to our route
Big Boris is ever so kind
So patient even when we whine
This is so cool to the circus without grownups
Big Boris is one of us, as the horse gallops*

(c) ladyleemanila 2016

* The Wrapped Refrain, created by Jan Turner, consists of 2 or more stanzas of 6 lines each; Meter: 8,8,8,8,12,12 and Rhyme Scheme: a,a,b,b,c,c.

Refrain rule: In each stanza the first 4 syllables (or 4 single-syllable words) in the first line must be the last 4 syllables (or 4 single-syllable words) at the end of the last line. This is what wraps each stanza with a repeated refrain …thus, the Wrapped Refrain.

Optional: The first stanza refrain and last stanza refrain can be joined (or loosely joined) together for the title of the poem.

For: Microfiction challenge #26: A journey

Microfiction challenge #24: Moonlit night

Microfiction challenge #24: Moonlit night

611px-repin_iliya_moon_night
painting by Iliya Repin

THIS WEEK’S WORDS come from “Take Your Kids to the Funeral” by Michelle Boisseau: valves, church, coughs, weirdness, liturgy, furtive, kids, smell, heads, dabbing, swinging, scissors

reflection from the moon as she waited
and the dog dabbed his mouth in the water
liturgy of wait as the sky’s clouded

she coughed in the cold evening but hung on
the dog swung his head, might have heard some sound
coming from the mountain and forest yon

it might be furtive but she’s always here
in her best coat and beret every night
just in case he might show up and appear

the church bell’s ringing, people coming out
kids in their best clothes making such a fuss
the smell of the trees and the night fade-out

the lady and the dog went home tonight
and the liturgy of wait continues
until he comes back, on their moonlit night

(c) ladyleemanila 2016

For: Microfiction challenge #24: Moonlit night by Jane Dougherty, Whirligig 87 by Magical Mystical Teacher