Music Prompt #13: Snow Patrol – “Run” #musicchallenge #amwriting #music

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You are a bright star in my struggle
I sigh and push my fringe back
You lighting up my road on my way
Lifting my spirit my good old Jack

I have no other star, just you
With you, my world is complete
On my way, you lighting up my road
With you by my side, isn’t life sweet?

We can weather the storm as I swirl
My hero, a mystery
You lighting up my road on my way
Then we can have a nice pot of tea

You are in charge of my light brigade
You hold the key to my heart
On my way, you lighting up my road
I cannot bear us to be apart*

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

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* The ZaniLa Rhyme, a form created by Laura Lamarca, consists 4 lines per stanza.
The rhyme scheme for this form is abcb and a syllable count of 9/7/9/9 per stanza.
Line 3 contains internal rhyme and is repeated in each odd numbered stanza.
Even stanzas contain the same line but swapped.
The ZaniLa Rhyme has a minimum of 3 stanzas and no maximum poem length.

For: Music Prompt #13: Snow Patrol – “Run” #musicchallenge #amwriting #music , Wordle 320 Oct 7 by brenda warren , Sunday Writing Prompt #223

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Sonnet XVI by Pablo Neruda

I love the handful of the earth you are.
Because of its meadows, vast as a planet,
I have no other star. You are my replica
of the multiplying universe

Your wide eyes, are the only light I know
from extinguished constellations;
your skin throbs like the streak
of a meteor through rain.

Your hips were that much of the moon for me;
your deep mouth and its delights, that much sun;
your heart, fiery with its long red rays,

was that much ardent light, like honey in the shade.
So I pass across your burning form, kissing
you – compact and planetary, my dove, my globe.

Music Prompt #12: Miley Cyrus – “Malibu” #amwriting #musicchallenge

With you we could be anywhere
Up the mountains, hills or by the ocean
We’d go somewhere cultural or a place to hide
We would have memories to share

Share the laughter and the lessons
We keep going back to places we like
Singapore, Bali, Palawan, Rome and Paris
To relax or do some actions

Actions and reactions, all there
An hour, a day, weekend or longer
It doesn’t matter as long as you are with me
And for as long as we both care

Care to look for some megalith
Ancient ruins, artefacts and paintings
Temples, churches, safaris and some adventures
Happy as long as you are with*

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

* The RemyLa Rhyme Form, a form created by Laura Lamarca, consists of 4 stanzas. Each stanza has four lines. The syllable count per stanza is 8/10/12/8 and rhyme scheme is abca defd ghig jklj. The first word of stanza 1 must also be the last word of stanza 4. The last word of stanza 1 must also be the first word of stanza 2 and the last word of stanza 2 must be the first word of stanza 3. Finally, the last word of stanza 3 must also be the first word of stanza 4.

This form is named after Laura’s daughter, Remy Lawren Lamarca. La is her signature.

For: Music Prompt #12: Miley Cyrus – “Malibu” #amwriting #musicchallenge

Music Prompt #11: Miranda Lambert “Pink Sun Glasses” #musicchallenge #music #amwriting

A dreamy aura of an arabesque
Feeling positive today
Clutching my skirt like an expert
Loop in a granny knot as I sway

Admire the pistil and stamen
Wearing my pink sunglasses
Like an expert clutching my skirt
Measure of luck as it arises

To reverse the bad vibes I might have
Simmer hope as I dawdle
Clutching my skirt like an expert
I can be contented and blissful*

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

* The ZaniLa Rhyme, a form created by Laura Lamarca, consists 4 lines per stanza.
The rhyme scheme for this form is abcb and a syllable count of 9/7/9/9 per stanza.
Line 3 contains internal rhyme and is repeated in each odd numbered stanza.
Even stanzas contain the same line but swapped.
The ZaniLa Rhyme has a minimum of 3 stanzas and no maximum poem length.

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For: Music Prompt #11: Miranda Lambert “Pink Sun Glasses” #musicchallenge #music #amwriting , Wordle #171

Music Prompt #8: “Calm Before The Storm” by Sarah Ross #amwriting #musicchallenge #music

Calm before the storm
I hope it hits you hard
You left my heart scarred
Gave you my soul in form
And you made it deform
I have to keep my guard

How could you be so cruel?
When I have given all?
You’re such an evil gall
Without me your life’s null
All your fault, you’re blameful
I looked at you, appalled

I’m happy to be free
And you don’t deserve me*

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

*
The HexSonnetta, created by Andrea Dietrich, consists of two six-line stanzas and a finishing rhyming couplet with the following set of rules:

Meter: Iambic Trimeter
Rhyme Scheme: a/bb/aa/b c/dd/cc/d ee

Iambic Trimeter means the usual iambic (alternating unstressed/stressed) meter for every line of the poem, but instead of the ten syllables that comprise a typical sonnet’s iambic pentameter, this particular form uses six syllables of iambic trimeter per line. Thus, the name HexSonnetta. The first part of the form’s name refers to the syllable count per line. The second part of the name, Sonnetta, is to show this to be a form similar to the sonnet, yet with its shorter lines and different rhyme scheme, it is not the typical sonnet. Not only does this poem have six syllables per line, it also has a set of two six-line stanzas, giving an extra “hex” to the meaning of HexSonnetta. The rhyme scheme is a bit of a mixture of the two traditional sonnet types, with the two 6-line stanzas having more the rhyme scheme of an Italian sonnet, but with the ending rhyming couplet being the featured rhyme scheme of the English sonnet. The first stanza presents the theme of the poem, with the second stanza serving to change the tone of the poem, to introduce a new aspect of the theme or to give added details. The final couplet, as in an English sonnet, can be either a summary (if the theme is simple) or it could be the resolution to a problem presented in the theme. In any event, it should nicely tie together the whole piece and could even appear as a nice “twist” presented at the end.

For: Music Prompt #8: “Calm Before The Storm” by Sarah Ross #amwriting #musicchallenge #music

Music Prompt #4: Lady Antebellum – “You Look Good” #musicprompt

I may not turn heads all day but
I know my worth, give me credit
You can take me to a banquet
I’m beautiful no matter what

In my own way I know I’m good
I can add, deduct and audit
I’m fine, had a happy childhood
I’m beautiful no matter what

Plus I can look after myself
I’m not bad nor am I slut
Read all the books in the bookshelf
I’m beautiful no matter what

I may not turn heads all day but
I’m beautiful no matter what*

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

* A Kyrielle Sonnet consists of 14 lines (three rhyming quatrain stanzas and a non-rhyming couplet). Just like the traditional Kyrielle poem, the Kyrielle Sonnet also has a repeating line or phrase as a refrain (usually appearing as the last line of each stanza). Each line within the Kyrielle Sonnet consists of only eight syllables. French poetry forms have a tendency to link back to the beginning of the poem, so common practice is to use the first and last line of the first quatrain as the ending couplet. This would also re-enforce the refrain within the poem. Therefore, a good rhyming scheme for a Kyrielle Sonnet would be:

AabB, ccbB, ddbB, AB -or- AbaB, cbcB, dbdB, AB.

 

For: Music Prompt #4: Lady Antebellum – “You Look Good” #musicprompt

Music Prompt #3: “Whiskey in the Jar” sung by Metallica #musicchallenge

One day in a shed, us kids and our Dad’s old brew
Feeling vicarious and smart, though we’re scrawny
Pile it on, pile it on, we shouted, no one disagrees

Beer with mashed potatoes and a wedge of cheese
We talked and talked like witches and their cauldron
One day in a shed, us kids and our Dad’s old brew

With our primitive glee made wild, we’re enjoying this
Loud music coming from the radio, we giggled with our jokes
Feeling vicarious and smart, though we’re scrawny

Friends from the neighbourhood, they’re here, too
More beer, more crisps, Dad’s brew is good
Pile it on, pile it on, we shouted, no one disagrees*

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

* Cascade, a form created by Udit Bhatia, is all about receptiveness, but in a smooth cascading way like a waterfall. The poem does not have any rhyme scheme; therefore, the layout is simple. Say the first verse has three lines. Line one of verse one becomes the last line of verse two. To follow in suit, the second line of verse one becomes the last line of verse three. The third line of verse one now becomes the last line of verse four, the last stanza of the poem. See the structure example below:

a/b/c, d/e/A, f/g/B, h/i/C

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For: Music Prompt #3: “Whiskey in the Jar” sung by Metallica #musicchallenge , Wordle #154

Give me the key to your heart – Friday Music Prompt #1: “Jeter un Sort/Put A Spell On” by Alex Nevsky

Give me the key to your heart – Friday Music Prompt #1: “Jeter un Sort/Put A Spell On” by Alex Nevsky

Please give me the key to your heart
I collapse from my splintered life
I can crawl to you but don’t thwart
We meet again in afterlife

I crack the code and open it
Our misunderstanding is rife
Until every bit of sunlit
We meet again in afterlife

In open space where I can breathe
All the things I said when we strife
Not like the grey ocean that seethe
We meet again in afterlife

Please give me the key to your heart
We meet again in afterlife*

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

* A Kyrielle Sonnet consists of 14 lines (three rhyming quatrain stanzas and a non-rhyming couplet). Just like the traditional Kyrielle poem, the Kyrielle Sonnet also has a repeating line or phrase as a refrain (usually appearing as the last line of each stanza). Each line within the Kyrielle Sonnet consists of only eight syllables. French poetry forms have a tendency to link back to the beginning of the poem, so common practice is to use the first and last line of the first quatrain as the ending couplet. This would also re-enforce the refrain within the poem. Therefore, a good rhyming scheme for a Kyrielle Sonnet would be: AabB, ccbB, ddbB, AB -or- AbaB, cbcB, dbdB, AB.

 

For: Friday Music Prompt #1: “Jeter un Sort/Put A Spell On” by Alex Nevsky