Music Prompt #8: “Calm Before The Storm” by Sarah Ross #amwriting #musicchallenge #music

Calm before the storm
I hope it hits you hard
You left my heart scarred
Gave you my soul in form
And you made it deform
I have to keep my guard

How could you be so cruel?
When I have given all?
You’re such an evil gall
Without me your life’s null
All your fault, you’re blameful
I looked at you, appalled

I’m happy to be free
And you don’t deserve me*

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

*
The HexSonnetta, created by Andrea Dietrich, consists of two six-line stanzas and a finishing rhyming couplet with the following set of rules:

Meter: Iambic Trimeter
Rhyme Scheme: a/bb/aa/b c/dd/cc/d ee

Iambic Trimeter means the usual iambic (alternating unstressed/stressed) meter for every line of the poem, but instead of the ten syllables that comprise a typical sonnet’s iambic pentameter, this particular form uses six syllables of iambic trimeter per line. Thus, the name HexSonnetta. The first part of the form’s name refers to the syllable count per line. The second part of the name, Sonnetta, is to show this to be a form similar to the sonnet, yet with its shorter lines and different rhyme scheme, it is not the typical sonnet. Not only does this poem have six syllables per line, it also has a set of two six-line stanzas, giving an extra “hex” to the meaning of HexSonnetta. The rhyme scheme is a bit of a mixture of the two traditional sonnet types, with the two 6-line stanzas having more the rhyme scheme of an Italian sonnet, but with the ending rhyming couplet being the featured rhyme scheme of the English sonnet. The first stanza presents the theme of the poem, with the second stanza serving to change the tone of the poem, to introduce a new aspect of the theme or to give added details. The final couplet, as in an English sonnet, can be either a summary (if the theme is simple) or it could be the resolution to a problem presented in the theme. In any event, it should nicely tie together the whole piece and could even appear as a nice “twist” presented at the end.

For: Music Prompt #8: “Calm Before The Storm” by Sarah Ross #amwriting #musicchallenge #music

Music Prompt #4: Lady Antebellum – “You Look Good” #musicprompt

I may not turn heads all day but
I know my worth, give me credit
You can take me to a banquet
I’m beautiful no matter what

In my own way I know I’m good
I can add, deduct and audit
I’m fine, had a happy childhood
I’m beautiful no matter what

Plus I can look after myself
I’m not bad nor am I slut
Read all the books in the bookshelf
I’m beautiful no matter what

I may not turn heads all day but
I’m beautiful no matter what*

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

* A Kyrielle Sonnet consists of 14 lines (three rhyming quatrain stanzas and a non-rhyming couplet). Just like the traditional Kyrielle poem, the Kyrielle Sonnet also has a repeating line or phrase as a refrain (usually appearing as the last line of each stanza). Each line within the Kyrielle Sonnet consists of only eight syllables. French poetry forms have a tendency to link back to the beginning of the poem, so common practice is to use the first and last line of the first quatrain as the ending couplet. This would also re-enforce the refrain within the poem. Therefore, a good rhyming scheme for a Kyrielle Sonnet would be:

AabB, ccbB, ddbB, AB -or- AbaB, cbcB, dbdB, AB.

 

For: Music Prompt #4: Lady Antebellum – “You Look Good” #musicprompt

Music Prompt #3: “Whiskey in the Jar” sung by Metallica #musicchallenge

One day in a shed, us kids and our Dad’s old brew
Feeling vicarious and smart, though we’re scrawny
Pile it on, pile it on, we shouted, no one disagrees

Beer with mashed potatoes and a wedge of cheese
We talked and talked like witches and their cauldron
One day in a shed, us kids and our Dad’s old brew

With our primitive glee made wild, we’re enjoying this
Loud music coming from the radio, we giggled with our jokes
Feeling vicarious and smart, though we’re scrawny

Friends from the neighbourhood, they’re here, too
More beer, more crisps, Dad’s brew is good
Pile it on, pile it on, we shouted, no one disagrees*

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

* Cascade, a form created by Udit Bhatia, is all about receptiveness, but in a smooth cascading way like a waterfall. The poem does not have any rhyme scheme; therefore, the layout is simple. Say the first verse has three lines. Line one of verse one becomes the last line of verse two. To follow in suit, the second line of verse one becomes the last line of verse three. The third line of verse one now becomes the last line of verse four, the last stanza of the poem. See the structure example below:

a/b/c, d/e/A, f/g/B, h/i/C

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For: Music Prompt #3: “Whiskey in the Jar” sung by Metallica #musicchallenge , Wordle #154

Give me the key to your heart – Friday Music Prompt #1: “Jeter un Sort/Put A Spell On” by Alex Nevsky

Give me the key to your heart – Friday Music Prompt #1: “Jeter un Sort/Put A Spell On” by Alex Nevsky

Please give me the key to your heart
I collapse from my splintered life
I can crawl to you but don’t thwart
We meet again in afterlife

I crack the code and open it
Our misunderstanding is rife
Until every bit of sunlit
We meet again in afterlife

In open space where I can breathe
All the things I said when we strife
Not like the grey ocean that seethe
We meet again in afterlife

Please give me the key to your heart
We meet again in afterlife*

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

* A Kyrielle Sonnet consists of 14 lines (three rhyming quatrain stanzas and a non-rhyming couplet). Just like the traditional Kyrielle poem, the Kyrielle Sonnet also has a repeating line or phrase as a refrain (usually appearing as the last line of each stanza). Each line within the Kyrielle Sonnet consists of only eight syllables. French poetry forms have a tendency to link back to the beginning of the poem, so common practice is to use the first and last line of the first quatrain as the ending couplet. This would also re-enforce the refrain within the poem. Therefore, a good rhyming scheme for a Kyrielle Sonnet would be: AabB, ccbB, ddbB, AB -or- AbaB, cbcB, dbdB, AB.

 

For: Friday Music Prompt #1: “Jeter un Sort/Put A Spell On” by Alex Nevsky

Music Prompt # 77 “Careless Whisper” by George Michael.

Music Prompt # 77 “Careless Whisper” by George Michael.

Months and years have passed and I still miss you
Your sweet smile, apple stew and coffee brew
I long for your velvety touch
And the sunshine I miss that much
To add, our foothill walks and the mountains
Wearing my red dress with pearly buttons

No regrets, I always say, what we had
Those were special and really, not so bad
Things happened and now we’re apart
No choice but have happiness thwart
Learn the lesson, say thanks and we move on
Goodbye, we now let bygone by bygone

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

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For: Music Prompt # 77 “Careless Whisper” by George Michael., Wordle 292 Mar 25 by brenda warren

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Music Prompt # 74 – “A Thousand Years”by Christina Perri – Valentine’s Day Special

Music Prompt # 74 – “A Thousand Years”by Christina Perri – Valentine’s Day Special

It was the day you said hello
First thing in the morning that was
The lab you were about to show
We were introduced, then a pause

First thing in the morning that was
I was the new girl in the lab
We were introduced, then a pause
City was a bit of a drab

I was the new girl in the lab
And you were such a gentleman
City was a bit of a drab
You showed it to me like a fan

And you were such a gentleman
Showered me all your attention
You showed it to me like a fan
With friends, we had a lot of fun

Showered me all your attention
Till the last day of the training
With friends, we had a lot of fun
And from a distance, love we bring

Till the last day of the training
Two years later we got married
And from a distance, love we bring
After thirty years, love we lead

Two years later we got married
The lab you were about to show
After thirty years, love we lead
It was the day you said hello*

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

* The pantoum consists of a series of quatrains rhyming ABAB in which the second and fourth lines of a quatrain recur as the first and third lines in the succeeding quatrain; each quatrain introduces a new second rhyme as BCBC, CDCD. The first line of the series recurs as the last line of the closing quatrain, and third line of the poem recurs as the second line of the closing quatrain, rhyming ZAZA.

The design is simple:

Line 1
Line 2
Line 3
Line 4

Line 5 (repeat of line 2)
Line 6
Line 7 (repeat of line 4)
Line 8

Continue with as many stanzas as you wish, but the ending stanzathen repeats the second and fourth lines of the previous stanza (as its first and third lines), and also repeats the third line of the first stanza, as its second line, and the first line of the first stanza as its fourth. So the first line of the poem is also the last.

Last stanza:

Line 2 of previous stanza
Line 3 of first stanza
Line 4 of previous stanza
Line 1 of first stanza

For: Music Prompt # 74 – “A Thousand Years”by Christina Perri – Valentine’s Day Special, Day 10 #Loveuary – Finding You/Flame #writephoto, OpenLinkNight #189 by Grace, Share Your Love Story

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Music Prompt #73 – “Staying Alive” by Bee Gees

Music Prompt #73 – “Staying Alive” by Bee Gees

life’s tough but I’m staying alive
up and down, round and round it goes
happy, sad, winner or loser

different roles we have as we grow
challenges and hindrances, too
life’s tough and I’m staying alive

hurt several times but go on
one day we might hit the jackpot
up and down, round and round it goes

places to see, people to meet
life’s wonderful, no matter what
happy, sad, winner or loser*

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

* Cascade, a form created by Udit Bhatia, is all about receptiveness, but in a smooth cascading way like a waterfall. The poem does not have any rhyme scheme; therefore, the layout is simple. Say the first verse has three lines. Line one of verse one becomes the last line of verse two. To follow in suit, the second line of verse one becomes the last line of verse three. The third line of verse one now becomes the last line of verse four, the last stanza of the poem. See the structure example below:

a/b/c, d/e/A, f/g/B, h/i/C

For: Music Prompt #73 – “Staying Alive” by Bee Gees