We’ve got the power

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– Gerald Larocque

We’ve got the power vested in us
Us two brunettes and our mawkish we
A swain and a bombshell in melodious control
Control under the gibbous moon and fen a
Power to the Liliputian people, not corrupt
Corrupt others all gone, as we’ve got the power

Power of the pen as we write in our garage
Garage full of motivation and creative power
Don’t pester us with nonsense request
Request something useful but abuse us don’t
We may look ordinary but we’ve got the power
Power to control the world from us we*

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

* Mirror Sestet

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For: Photo Challenge #185, Day 10 – Power and Control , Wordle #174

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First Line Friday -October 13th, 2017

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The autumn chill descended over town
and with it came rot and ruin and chill
a place of gloom where people are let-down
through the night air a piercing whistle shrill
and the wolf prancing around with his kill
my heart seems to stop on this eerie night
canopy of bright stars above the hill
the howling wind, it’s time to fight or flight
and with this, am I having a meltdown?
too much stress, and I’m feeling being drown*

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

* The Decuain (pronounced deck•won), created by Shelley A. Cephas, is a short poem made up of 10 lines, which can be written on any subject. There are 10 syllables per line and the poem is written in iambic pentameter.

There are 3 set choices of rhyme scheme:

ababbcbcaa, ababbcbcbb, or ababbcbccc

For: First Line Friday -October 13th, 2017

Saturday Mix – Opposing Forces, 14 October 2017

as shallow as the tears in eyes
and as deep as the Grand Canyon
our love

below the line, some challenges
above all else, our love to share
outlook

as shallow as the pan frying
as deep as Pacific Ocean
trials

thankful for blessing above all
below that, accept what’s given
living

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

For: Saturday Mix – Opposing Forces, 14 October 2017

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Sonnet of a play – Bonus Wordle – Shakespearian Style

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apple boughs laden with gorgeous blossom
the land pleasant with cowslips and bluebells
as the clock strikes six, viol plays with drum
everything’s tinctured with humour she tells

pantomime villain enters with swagger
his clothes are sodden with strong musk oil
owls are hooting outside stained glass so blur
children playing outdoor messing with soil

time for the play to start, everyone’s in
theatre so packed, standing room only
in the middle of the play, actors grin
they argued, he says sorry with a plea

we’re taken to a land of make-believe
for two hours, plots and stories interweave*

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

* A Sonnet is a poem consisting of 14 lines (iambic pentameter) with a particular rhyming scheme:
A Shakespearean (English) sonnet has three quatrains and a couplet, and rhymes abab cdcd efef gg.
Usually, English Sonnet has 10 syllables per line.

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For: Bonus Wordle – Shakespearian Style

Dried sunflowers athwart the man

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– Denise Kwong

THIS WEEK’S WORDS come from “This Is No Case of Petty Right or Wrong” by Edward Thomas: petty, hate, patriot, athwart, cauldrons, clear, yesterday, miss, broods, dust, live, endure

Dried sunflowers athwart the man
A patriot that’s clear
He had to endure what he can
Hates the dust, that’s his fear
A petty life he has to live
Missing fresh air that’s admissive
A petty life
A petty life
He broods, hope he’s more assertive

Dried sunflowers athwart the man
It happened yesterday
Stirring the cauldron as he can
Adding some herbs and whey
Such a tough life he has to lead
And all the world is full of greed
Such a tough life
Such a tough life
Time for a change we have agreed

Dried sunflowers athwart the man
So toxic he can’t breathe
Doesn’t think he will have his clan
To pass what he bequeath
What has just happened to the world?
Transformation to be unfurled
What has happened?
What has happened?
It’s best to live in our dream world*

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

* The Trijan Refrain, created by Jan Turner, consists of three 9-line stanzas, for a total of 27 lines. Line 1 is the same in all three stanzas, although a variation of the form is not to repeat the same line at the beginning of each stanza. In other words, the beginning line of each stanza can be different. The first four syllables of line 5 in each stanza are repeated as the double-refrain for lines 7 and 8. The Trijan Refrain is a rhyming poem with a set meter and rhyme scheme as follows:

Rhyme scheme: a/b/a/b/c/c/d,d refrain of first 4 words of line five /c

Meter: 8/6/8/6/8/8/4,4 refrain/8

For: Photo Challenge #184, Whirligig 132

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Music Prompt #13: Snow Patrol – “Run” #musicchallenge #amwriting #music

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You are a bright star in my struggle
I sigh and push my fringe back
You lighting up my road on my way
Lifting my spirit my good old Jack

I have no other star, just you
With you, my world is complete
On my way, you lighting up my road
With you by my side, isn’t life sweet?

We can weather the storm as I swirl
My hero, a mystery
You lighting up my road on my way
Then we can have a nice pot of tea

You are in charge of my light brigade
You hold the key to my heart
On my way, you lighting up my road
I cannot bear us to be apart*

(c) ladyleemanila 2017

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* The ZaniLa Rhyme, a form created by Laura Lamarca, consists 4 lines per stanza.
The rhyme scheme for this form is abcb and a syllable count of 9/7/9/9 per stanza.
Line 3 contains internal rhyme and is repeated in each odd numbered stanza.
Even stanzas contain the same line but swapped.
The ZaniLa Rhyme has a minimum of 3 stanzas and no maximum poem length.

For: Music Prompt #13: Snow Patrol – “Run” #musicchallenge #amwriting #music , Wordle 320 Oct 7 by brenda warren , Sunday Writing Prompt #223

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Sonnet XVI by Pablo Neruda

I love the handful of the earth you are.
Because of its meadows, vast as a planet,
I have no other star. You are my replica
of the multiplying universe

Your wide eyes, are the only light I know
from extinguished constellations;
your skin throbs like the streak
of a meteor through rain.

Your hips were that much of the moon for me;
your deep mouth and its delights, that much sun;
your heart, fiery with its long red rays,

was that much ardent light, like honey in the shade.
So I pass across your burning form, kissing
you – compact and planetary, my dove, my globe.